ON THE USE OF THE PRONOUNS I AND ME
This is a recurring question from writers and editors. According to The Chicago Manual of Style: 16th Edition, it is the most “persistent slips” to misuse the nominative pronoun in a compound object.

On these sentences, the pronouns I and me are misused:

The memo was addressed to you and I.
You and me will be going north this summer.

The Chicago Manual of Style suggests that the best way to check is to use the pronoun alone. On the first sentence, it is totally incorrect to say, “The memo was addressed to I.” Therefore, the correct pronoun is me. On the second sentence, we do not say, “Me will be going north this summer.” Thus, the right pronoun is I.

ON THE USE OF WHO AND WHOM
Always remember that the pronoun who and whoever are in the nominative form, whereas the pronouns whom and whomever are in the objective form.

e.g.
Who drove the truck last night?

Whoever drove it was a real pro.

To whom should I talk?    or      With whom should I talk?

Whomever you talked to should be a patient one.

< Previous Chapter

The PCDSPO Style Guide

Next Chapter >